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independence, removing the foundation of the mission of the united nations, so thehere will probably be a nw mission. >> i hope we will succeed in adopting a successor mandate for the south. of course, it would be best if the north cooperated, and i hope that germany can make relative contribution to this mission. >> in syria, the situation is completely unclear. thousands of syrians have fled to turkey. syrian troops have attacked villagers in the boborderegion. more and more people are demonstrating against the regime. a libyan-style intervention is not l likel but germany intends to keep syria on the security council agenenda. >> it is scandalous t that the security council still has not strongly condemned the regime. the best thing would be sanctions, of course. the regime must be politically isolated. we cannot really intervene. it would be morere difficult. it is different from libya. >> libya is a constant issue and is likely to remain so until gaddafi has been dealt with. >> gaddafi is indicted by the internationanal crinal court. when he is no longer in power, the international comm
humanitarian disaster in world gear that is how the united nations commissioner for refugees is describing the drought ravaging east africa. today, he urged kenya to open a new refugee camp completed last year but never used. currently more than 350,000 people are sheltering in camps. it's from that we get this report. >> every morning, the weight, the weary and hungry. more than 1000 people desperate to into the refugee camp. the story is depressingly familiar. the drop in somalia drove her here, but like many others, she had to leave a sick relative, her husband, behind. >> he told me to save myself, save our children. do not stay around to die. some in the village were already dead. nor are right here -- this man ever arrived here a few weeks ago with his wife and parents, but on the long walk, his 3- year-old son died. >> he was crying all the time. there was nothing we could do. he was so hungry, so he just gave up. we buried him by the roadside. >> the camp here is now overflowing. there are too many people calling out for help. it was built for 90,000 people, but there are already m
famine. that was the warning from the united nations today, and it comes with a call for more international aid to stop the crisis from spreading. >> now it is official. somalia is sinking into famine. it is the first time that compelling word has been deployed in almost 20 years. the united nations is hoping it will idle its the world into action triggered a conflict has already driven -- into action. the conflict has already driven people into camps like this one. the former irish president was here during the last famine. now she is back wondering why the world could not prevent it from happening again. >> since i was here in 1992, and when i looked around and see again, and these are very resilient people, and they want the best. they want food and water for their families. >> of substantial aid operation is already under way. supplies are arriving in neighboring kenya, but the uae is asking for 185 million pounds immediately. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those
that the u.s. will provide full support in an investigation. a united nations security council statement described terrorism as one of the most serious threats to international peace and security. >> any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable regardless of their motivation, wherever, whenever, and whomever by committed. >>> prime minister kan has called for a rescission of the nuclear policy. >> translator: i believe that japan should aim at building a society that is not dependant on nuclear power. we need to reduce nuclear independent. in terms of administration, many people had been pointing out early on that the nuclear and industrial safety agency had insufficients in checking. for example, i have asked to suspend the operations and introduce the stress test. these decisions are based on my position to insure the safety of the people. they are also consistent with my basic ideas on nuclear energy. >> kan also said the government is responsible to answer questions in the public sector. earlier, we spoke with the political comen tater on the policy. >> what is your take? >>
. the united nations extends airlift's to other regions in east africa as it fights the ban. and out of the water -- germany pulls out of the world swimming championships in shanghai. well, the next few hours will be crucial to the solvency of the united states. >> the u.s. house of representatives is expected to vote on a debt reduction bill proposed by the leader of the republicans in the house, john boehner. >> if it passes the house, the bill will go to the senate where democratic leader harry reid has already promised that it will be defeated. >> time is running out for compromise. on august 2, the u.s. treasury says it will not be able to pay its bills anymore. >> ♪ raise the debt ceiling ♪ >> this route intends to inject humor into a grave situation gravethis r -- this rap intends to inject humor into a grave situation. people are free welfare programs for the elderly and poor will be hit hardest. the medicare, social security, medicaid is all the working people have going for them in this country, and we just are not taking another step backward. >> republicans insist th
minutes' time. >> the first big formal step so join the united nations, that should be a fairly straightforward and speedy process. it begins today with a vote in the security council and wraps up with endorsement from member states on thursday. barbra looks at how the u.n. is making room for its newest member. >> the republic of south sudan will become the newest member of the united nations, but the hall of the general assembly is full so the u.n. is looking at the possibility of squeezing in another desk although there seems to be technical difficulties with that. there's the holy sea and the palestine observer mission, but that would be a bit awkward because the palestinians are looking to make a bid for their own statehood late they are month. at any trait u.n. will try to find a way to put them in probably between south africa spained and then it will have to find its diplomatic space. south sudan will most likely find its allies with other states some fear they may be at war in the future with -- whatever the case, it will take some diplomatic musical chairs to steat sout
. in the warning from the united nations as it tries to attack the famine in somalia. the u.s. senate has rejected a bill to raise america's debt ceiling passed earlier by a republican-controlled house of representatives. the vote has been expected. there are intense talks to reach a compromise. the leader of the democrats in the u.s. senate, harry reid, says it is typical. >> it is the worst possible time to conduct a filibuster. and they are forcing us to wait until tomorrow morning to have this vote. our economy hangs on the balance. for the first time in history, we are headed for economic disaster if we do not reach a compromise. [inaudible] [unintelligible] there was a meeting in my office with republicans this morning that fell through. we have heard a lot of talk about being interested in a compromise, but they need to move forward. they are refusing to negotiate with us. all they do is talk. the house will hold an up or down vote i was told on my proposal. it is time for us to be adults, and come together in a compromise for the american people. >> george is in washington and has been wat
with a few calgary course charges and it is quite a story. but the united nations says nato took over the afghanistan campaign. and there we find another find of the coffee out. it turns out -- caveat. it turns out some allies simply do not wish to make more where there were no shooting battles. some did it one to fight unless they have helicopters there were all of these rules than pretty soon we started to see the folks who wanted to send soldiers out to the field to have almost insulting checklist so this starts to develop in buy the way i am very careful when a make a statement about the caveat because i don't mean in any way to cut down on the bravery of the troops who are helping us americans out there. and the germans are not very willing to fight because of a historical precedent. it is very difficult for the germans to get over second world war history. please don't and feud any other motive into that. so now you have a copy ought with afghanistan where we're not prepared to use the allies because it is a different kind of four in technology have left them behind and estonia
charges. it's quite a story. but, in 2003 in the united nations says we need to know start stabilizing afghanistan. native took over the afghanistan campaign. and there we find yet another fault line developing. vendettas of fall line whose so-called caveat. some european allies simply did not wish to make war. it wanted areas where there were no shootings. others didn't want to fight at night. some didn't want to fight unless they have helicopters and so on. there were all these roles. we started to see folks who wanted to send soldiers out into the field consulting checklists to see what soldiers you could send out and what you could not. so this starts to develop. by the way, i'm very careful when i make this statement about caveat because i don't mean in any way to cut down on the bravery of the troops who were helping us, americans out there. the germans are not very willing to fight because of the very historical precedent. it is very difficult for germans to get over the second world war history. so i say these things just as matter-of-factly. please don't impede any other motiv
here. >> united nations first. >> glenn: what to go through the united nations. why would we had to go through the united nations. what did they use at the united nations? what was the president looking to trigger? >> the responseability to protect us. >> glenn: yes. the responsibility to protect act. which was done by her. released in a book. she sees it and says this is fantastic. i'll put all of my money. we'll come up with a whole new entity for the responsibility to protect. gets it kicked up in the united nations. they have been trying it for a while. nobody will bite. once you have this guy in office, this guy who works for this guy, you have all the players and office now. now you can trigger it. why is it important to trigger? because once you trigger it, when countries have the responseability to protect and you have all of this going on, gee, don't they have a responsibility to protect the palestinians against israel? how about protecting, huh about protecting the poor and unformingnate just coming over for a better life here in america? is it a stretch to say the world woul
and undivided capital. we should demand that the united nations stop its relentless activities to demonize israel and the jewish people and put our money where our mouth is. the most example of this bias is a cartoon posted by richard frost which was taken down minutes ago and the u.n., human rights council has appointed mr. falk as an expert, unquote to investigate and condemn israel and i'm sure that the viewers could see or pull it up on the internet what this cartoon depicts. it depicts americans and jews as blood thirsty dogs and that is not the first time that mr. falk has spread such venom. he has compared the treatment as the holocaust and questioned the veer asity of the 9/11 attacks and continues to work for the human rights council with his expenses and staff paid by u.s. taxpayers. and has the u.n. high commissioner of human rights ever condemned falk and ask him to condemn his post. never. and i understand that he says now that his account was hacked into and he has taken that drawing down. but i say enough is enough. the administration should withdraw from the bias human righ
in the united nations to attempt to bring about conditions that are better for the people of countries that we believe are under a totalitarian or a very authoritarian misrule. in this particular instance, there were other uprisings in t egypt uprisingsunisia which caught the attention of the world. -- in egypt and tunisia. in the case of libya, however, the arab league and the united nations and nato, and what have you, ultimately the united states, made a decision to intervene in a civil war. there was shooting going on in libya. it can very well be that person's organs -- who were innocent not be caught in the crossfire. this is the tragedy of civil wars, i suspect, wherever they may be held on this earth. our decision was to intervene in a civil war, and we're continuing to do that. despite the fact, we talked about the end of the muammar gaddafi rule, about the importance of gaddafi leaving the country and even sending out rumors that he may be entertaining such thoughts. my basic question is, if we do not have some ground rules. we have to have a more formal declaration of war. this coun
in washington, sudan already has it's own embassy and next week the united nations will discuss membership for the world's youngest country. sudan was the largest country in africa, it is now effectively divided into two nations. south sudan is roughly the size of texas and it's made up of mostly christians, why it's neighbor is made up of mostly muslims. sudan was racked by civil war for two decades. the man who will now lead south sudan as its first president is a former rebel leader who fought against the north. the new country faces huge challenges. it ranks near the bottom of the united nations poverty index, including the world's highest material mortality and the highest rates of female ill litera litera literacy. decades of fighting was finally ended with a piecemeal cease fire. i want to bring in supermodel alex wecht, you probably recognize her, alec thank you so much for joining us, this must be a huge moment for you. >> thank you so much for having me, absolutely. i'm so moved. i just -- there no words to express how much this independence of the south of sudan means, not just
the question. in december 1955 he persuaded the national security council that the united states should make an offer that would have of soviet financing of the dam. however, in the following months the negotiations with the egyptians broke down. i pay little attention to those negotiations. he was preoccupied with his health, the decision about running for a second term, and beginning the campaign. by june 7th, 1956, eisenhower appeared to have recovered from his heart attack. that morning he presided over a national security council meeting, had another 15 appointments, and practiced golf he read that evening he attended the white house news photographers' dinner and stayed up until midnight, a schedule his doctors would have vetoed. the president's guard doc -- dropped dr. snyder of this home and i retired to his bed almost immediately. the doctor was removing his clothes when the phone rang. snyder reached for it with a shudder. only the first lady could be calling at such an hour. this is another anguishing medical drama that i'm sorry to say again, but you're going to need to read the
on bbc news. a united nations tribunal investigating the murder of the former lebanese prime minister, rafik hariri, in 2005, has delivered a sealed indictment of the lebanese authorities. the suspects have not been named. but lebanese officials say several of them are members of the shia organization, hezbollah. including one senior commander. owen bennett jones reports from beirut. >> investigators and lawyers working behind these walls believe they know who killed ravi rafik hariri. they handed over four names to the lebanese authorities. the names are secret but the process is not. lebanon is now meant to arrest and detain the suspects. the new lebanese prime minister has said he'll deal with the tribunal's accusations in a responsible way. >> today we are confronting a new reality. and call upon all of us to consciously and purposely unite, setting as a priority the greater good of the nation, our own safety and a determination to know the truth, despite everything. so we can deal with the situation realistically and responsibly. keeping in mind that indictments, regardless of th
for foreign aid agencies. >> it says the united nations is exaggerating the severity of the drought saying it is sheer propaganda. welcome to g.m.t. also in the program, the debt crisis. now it's crunch time for washington as debt talks enter a crucial phase. jazz with a pakistani twist. local musicians revive their art with a new orchestra. it's midday here in london. 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in somalia. that's where the militant group denies that there is a family inin the country. they say the u.n. is exaggerating the drought severity for political reasons, therefore aid restrictions will remain in place. still the u.n. is saying it will work where it's feasible. >> thousands fleeing somalia. i must warn you, you may find this report from our correspondent distressing. >> they fled from southern somalia where they claim there is no famine, that the u.n.'s declaration of one is political. a baby's body lies next to those still fighting. still fighting for their lives. the crude measure of this humanitarian crisis. the combination of war and drought have created a devastating
the united nations, that cautions 10 million people in somalia, kenya, uganda, and other places are affected. it has already forced tens of thousands of people to walk long distances to refugee camps in kenya. we have more from the border with kenya. >> this is a place where life hangs in the balance. every single day. this child is just six months of age, and now feverish. and this is another child, who is older and weaker. as well as malnutrition, he has diarrhea and a chest infection, but if he dies, it will be the drought that kills him. july 2011, and once again, this part of that is cursed, teetering on the brink of disaster. one person is fighting a constant battle to save life year, and he does not always win. >> they come in very bad shape. sometimes the children just die, slipping away through your fingers, but we do not stop there. you have to look at the next one and tell a mother what has happened. you have done your best and go ahead to the next one. >> the drug is killing the livestock, too. the animals that for many are there only assets are simply dropping dead. to escape th
on to the information they are getting. we took malcolms idea. we got the united nations convention of the rights of a child. we constructed some of the basic elements. over the years, we created human rights report cards where the young folks in me this organization, who were just coming home, one month they did a report card with a graded the public schools. the next month, they greeted the police in their community. the next month, they greeted the health care services in their community. all of these things -- there's an international convention that says young people have a basic human rights. not citizenship rights but human-rights that need to be protected around the world. everybody in the united nations assembly signed this except for the united states and somalia. we have begun to gather the information. i have a little bit more literature year if you want to talk afterwards, and some examples of that, but that is one of the things we need to do. let's look at the fundamental violations of our rights that are happening in your community and think about how we can elevate this to a level
. the food is finally coming in. the united nations has begun airlifting food to eastern africa, trying to ease what is being called the world's worst humanitarian crisis. 12 million people from somalia to kenya to ethiopia are threatened by famine. hundreds of thousands are in camps, waiting for something to eat. >> emergency food supplies are on their way from kenya to somalia. the u.n. says it is faster to deliver aid by air than by road. the packets contain food rich in protein and energy. they are meant for severely malnourished children. >> there are 110 within the next few days, and 80 after that. we're sending it to supplementary feeding centers. >> every minute counts. this young boy desperately needs food. his mother brought him from somalia to the refugee camp in kenya. he is almost one year old, but ways just 3 kilograms, like a newborn. >> he should be 8 kilos to 9 kilos. it shows he is severely, severely malnourished. >> it is even worse back in somalia, where more than 3.5 million people are going hungry. >> a terrible story. for more, we talked to someone from the aid or
. the united nations authorized nato to launch air strikes in march. the mission was to protect the libyan people from the country's military. >> there's money for war but there's not money for jobs. there's not money for education. >> what we want -- they would be killing libyan people. >> a counterprotest featured people waving libyan flags and calling on nato to help the rebels fight against moammar gadhafi's government. the protestors say that the nato bombing is effective in stopping gadhafi's military from attacking its own people. >>> a memorial will be held in california tomorrow for former first lady, betty ford. she will then be brurd on thursday in michigan next to her husband, former president, gerald ford, at the gerald ford museum. mrs. ford died on friday. she may be best known for the rehabilitation center which bears her name. mrs. ford talked openly about her addiction to painkillers. the betty ford center has treated more than 90,000 people. >>> prince george's county police say they have made an arrest in a case on april 8th, firefighters were called to a bladensburg st
. on libya, i thanked president zuma for south africa's support in securing united nations security resolution 1970 and 1973 and voice leadership in the african union on this vital issue. now, it is no secret that we have disagreed on some aspects of how to respond to violence in libya, but we are agreed on the immediate imperative that all sides must take every effort to avoid the loss of civilian life. we agree on the process needed that the only safe and peaceful solution lies through a political transition, led and owned by the libyan people and backed by the united nations. and we agree on the ultimate destination that gaddafi must step aside to allow the people of libya to decide their own future in a democratic and united libya. on zimbabwe, we discuss how much we welcome the efforts of south africa and the south african development community to achieve a peaceful, prosperous, and democratic zimbabwe. we support the efforts to agree a robust road map in zimbabwe based around a reform elections. and as the road map delivers real political change, so britain is ready to revisit
, but pleads not guilty. mourners gathered in oslo. and the united nations say more needs to be done to fight hunger in the horn of africa. the world barely got a glimpse of the man who says he committed the worst massacre norway has seen in more than 60 years. anders behring breivik appeared in an oslo court on monday, but the judge said no to cameras. behind closed doors, breivik admitted to the bombing and the killing of scores of people. he will spend the next four weeks in solitary confinement. >> anders behring breivik was photographed leaving the courthouse. he did not look distraught, even after acknowledging he was responsible for the oslo bombing and massacre. it is one of the few photos of norway's most infamous man. reporters waited for hours. the hearing was held behind closed doors. afterwards, the judge disclosed what breivik had said at the hearing. >> while the accused has acknowledged the circumstances, he has not pleaded guilty. the accused believes he needed to carry out these acts in order to save norway and western europe from, and i quote, cultural marxism and an islami
from? this desperate mother pleads for help. she says we are dying, where is the united nations and where is the muslim world, is asking. natural disaster is compounded by man-made turmoil. washington says now it will allow aid so long as militants. do not militants >> we are aware that we have to find ways to this instance the somali people in order to stave off stockstarvation. >> these are vivid images of the worst crises of its kind for nearly two decades in this part of the world. they have captured the attention of the outside world. turning concern into concrete action remains an urgent challenge. bbc news reporting. >> we are joined by the unisex regional director for eastern and southern africa -- inisef. how muc -- unisef. how much aid are you able to get into the areas run by militants? >> we have been working in somalia over the past decade. like many other partners, there are constraints in getting access to where people need aid the most. it has always been my hope to negotiate with a range of partners, including elders, clan leaders, local authorities, getting a
in which communists operated was in these movements and as years at the united nations, she said she didn't have much trouble dealing with the russians because she had learned about the communists when she had been first lady. she learned a lot, i think, from joe lash. but notice accustomed to making the role of first lady one of real significance as a traveling ambassador for the first -- for the roosevelt administration, during world war ii, she makes an enormous number of visits. in fact, she's away from washington so much that the washington newspapers has a headline, mrs. roosevelt stays at white house overnight. [laughter] >> here she is visiting enlisted men at a base in the galapagos island off the coast of ecuador during a world war ii morale-building trip in latin america. here she is in england inspecting troops. why, she's certainly the first first lady ever to do this sort of thing, of course, she's traveling without franklin. and in washington, here she and mary mccloud bassoon are visiting a residence african-american women war workers. once again eleanor is making history
, united nations, the usual diplomacy and treaty system has always been that kind of a tension there. i want to examine that and see what this might be and what the prospects might be. >> host: to help readers of this book, or hats you could summarize the distinction that you draw between modern states, the state, the post date, the treaty of 1548 that ended the long religious wars which you say you were safe but focus on prospects. that the purpose of the state was issues of process, not issues of substance, meaning not issues of religion. perhaps you could just draw that argument out a little bit and tell us why does modern post-westphalian states as we call them, why those states have had trouble in this part of the world where islam is so strong. >> guest: before the modern age, that's before the early 17th century, going all the way back into antiquity, there were lots of different concepts of world order. the chinese had a world order. the world order in the south asian area, world order even in south america in the sense of mind. people thinking of themselves as being the center
relationship to the larger world which is a state, the united nations, the usual deformity in treaty systems, there's always been that tension there. i wanted to examine that to see what the origins might be and what the prospects might be. >> host: to help perspective readers of the book, perhaps you could summarize the distinction that you draw between modern states, the states that post-date the 1548 that ended the long religious wars which you say were states that focused on prospects, that the process of the state was issues of process, not issues of substance meaning not issue of religion. perhaps draw that argument out a little bit and tell us why those modern post-west states as we call them, why those states have had trouble in this part of the world where islamist was from? >> guest: before the modern age, that's before the early 17th century, all the way back to antiquity, there was lots of con cement of world order. the chinese had a world order. there's a world order in the south asian area, a world area in south america in sense of the mayans and people thinking of themselves b
tables its resolution for observance of the olympic truce the united nations general assembly based on this year that will add to a specific proposals for peace and reconciliation so we will maximize this historic opportunity to? >> i'm sure the whole house will want to congratulate lord bates for his great feat. we will be promoting -- sorry. [laughter] >> accidental apologies for the. we will be promoting a resolution to the united nations calling for the continued of service of the olympic truth for the 2012 games. we wish to make the most of this historic opportunity and we are considering other international initiatives to promote the spirit of the truths and it said here they are engaging our emphasis. >> mr. speaker, will parents up and down be horrified to know because of the government's proposal and the perfection of freedom though a person convicted of rape of a child will not automatically be put on the list from working with children? >> what we have done in terms of that is remove the huge number of people who are not a risk to children, but we do want to make sure tha
military forces on high alert, condemned the attacks on egypt at the united nations and ultimately led to a ceasefire announced on election day november 6, 1956. it's out and our. >> design. welcome to the atlanta history center. i'm the president and ceo of the history center. this is another livingston letcher which is made possible through the generous support of the livingston foundation, and we are ever so grateful to them for their continued support. our next lecture will be held may 16th and will feature james b. stewart come author of tangled webs, how false statements are undermining america from martha stewart to bernie madoff. i've seen some of the previews of this book, and you would be well edify is to be here. it's fascinating. also joining us for the featuring best-selling author of deval in the white city eric larsen who will be here. who will be discussing his new book in the garden of peace, love, terror and american family in hitler's berlin. tonight's lecture is being recorded by c-span and check your local listings for the broadcast state you can see it again. at t
the single most vulnerable on our planet after war. corruption in places like the united nations. >> i found padlocked room, young women's passports and a lot of u.s. currency. >> what about it, columbo. >> i don't know, but something [ bleep ] is going on. >> in a new movie "whistle-blower" an american police officer exposes a united nations cover-up of human sex trafficking in post-war bosnia. the academy award winning actress rachel weisz plays our next guest who is the actual individual who did this. kathy bolkovac. i congratulate both of you, along with the director, on bringing in to light. give us a sense what we need to know. >> the main thing you need to know this has not just been happening recently but going on for decades. >> what is "this is"? what's going on? >> human trafficking supporting prostitution, and organized crime that's been i guess basically entangled into the united nations, our police passports and our own state department for many, many years. >> when you say entangled what do you mean? >> people, people like myself who went overseas to serve our country and work
the united states of america is an extraordinary nation. it's an extraordinary democracy and one that doesn't necessarily travel with a straight line policy all the time. but there is hope that this issue will be addressed responsibleably and with accountability not only to the people of the united states but also to the people of the world. instability is never a good idea, never a good idea. and this level of uncertainty, the trepidation rising from august the 2nd is bringing about a lot of instability. >> do you think that the dangers that people speak of could happen any way, that watching this process, markets might lose that unshakeable confidence they had that u.s. treasury bills were the bedrock of the international financial system and that they were the cheapest debt that was the place where people went as a flight to safety. is all of that already being jeopardized? is there a danger that is being undermined? >> you're quite right in saying that there was a positive bias towards the united states of america, towards treasury bills. that was the case historically. and the current
of adversarial uneasy problematic relationship to the larger world, which is the state, united nations, the usual treaty systems there's always been that kind of attention. so to examine that to see with the origins might be and what prospect might be. >> host: to hold the prospective readers of this book perhaps you could summarize the distinction that you draw between modern states, the post states 1648 and the long religious war which you say the state's focus on prospect of the purpose of the state was issues the process, not issues of substance, meaning if not issues of religion. perhaps you could draw that out a little bit and tell us why those modern states as we call them, why they have had trouble in this part of the world where islamism is? >> guest: before the modern age, that is before the barely 17th century beckon to the antiquity there were lots of different concepts of world order and of the world order in the south asian area and world order even in south america people of thinking of themselves as being the center of any universe and deducting the things. that's changed in the e
for the talks since the 1970's, up through the united nations security council, that is the establishment or the transformation of the current republic of cyprus in to a federal state composing of two federal units, each run by each community, where, of course ,human rights -- of course, human rights will be fully respected, and greek and turkish cypriots will have the right to acquire property and live freely and settle freely throughout the islands, like it can do in the rest of the members of the european union. it is a big paradoxical -- that they could exercise such rights in other countries in europe, but not in their own country. and, of course, the right of legitimate owners to decide whether they want restitution for their property rights or want to be compensated for property or exchange their property. and, of course, corporations with turkish cypriots. -- incorporation of the turkish cypriots. we decided to join the european union because we strongly believe and still have this strong belief that membership in the european union will be the ultimate guarantee for a prosperous
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,685 (some duplicates have been removed)